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For better context, here is a 1:1,000,000 map of Clark County showing where the area in the previous post is located. The map we are trying to complete as Phase 1 of the Nevada Digital Dirt Mapping Project will be approximately 1:150,000. The tiling evident in this image is because the data are divided into the appropriate 100k sheets. For more background on the project, check out the Nevada Digital Dirt Mapping blog. Yes, there is some cross-posting going on…how else could I manage all of this stuff?

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Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

Here is a preliminary list of links to sites and resources that where mentioned during the Digital Innovations in Geoscience sessions at GSA:

Declan DePaor's geology kml projects:

http://www.lions.odu.edu/~ddepaor/Site/Google_Earth_Science.html

A simple, free, and effective program for geotagging your digital photos:

Google's free, geospatially aware photo-managing software, Picasa:

The amazing digital pen that you should really use:

The nearly as amazing digital pen you should consider using in the field:

One of many resources from SERC, this one is about using Google Earth to understand geologic maps. File this under uncanny obviousness. Shame on you if you don't incorporate this approach into your teaching.

Virtual Field work:

The mighty Gigapan Robot:

More to come.

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

If so, breakdown and join the 21st Century. Besides, this rock is heavy.

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

Check out the lineup for our Innovative (we hope) and Ambitious (for sure) session on Sunday:

P6: Pardee Keynote Symposium–Google Earth to Geoblogs: Digital Innovations in the Geosciences
Sunday, 18 October 2009
Portland Ballrooms 251/258

1:30 PM – Talks

1:30 PM
DIGITAL GEOLOGY IN THE 21st CENTURY: IT’S HERE, DON’T FEAR, GET INTO IT
P. Kyle House, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology & University of Nevada

1:45 PM
ONEGEOLOGY – MAKING GEOLOGY ACCESSIBLE
Ian Jackson, British Geological Survey

2:00 PM
I TWEET, THEREFORE I AM: SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE GEOSCIENCES
M. Lee Allison, Arizona Geological Survey

2:15 PM
ONE MAP – MANY MAPPERS: IMPLICATIONS OF INNOVATIVE MAPPING, MODELING, AND NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES FOR GEOSCIENCE EDUCATION
Declan G. De Paor, Old Dominion University

2:30 PM – Demonstration

GIGAGEOLOGY: VIRTUAL FIELD TRIPS IN A Web2.0 WORLD
Ronald C. Schott, Fort Hays State University

3:00 PM – Interactive Display Booths

EXPLORING WITH GOOGLE’S GEOSPATIAL TOOLS
Mano Marks, Josie Wernecke & Tina Ornduff, Google Inc.
John E. Bailey, University of Alaska Fairbanks

EMERGING DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GEOSCIENCE EDUCATION AND OUTREACH
Peter A. Selkin, University of Washington
Declan G. De Paor, Old Dominion University
Janice Gobert, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Karin B. Kirk, Carleton College
Steve Kluge, Resources for GeoScience Education
Glenn A. Richard, Stony Brook University
Steven J. Whitmeyer, James Madison University

USING DIGITAL TOOLS FOR GEOLOGY
Kyle House, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology & University of Nevada
Ian Jackson, British Geological Survey
M. Lee Allison, Arizona Geological Survey

MONITORING ROCK FALLS IN YOSEMITE VALLEY WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL, HIGH-RESOLUTION PANORAMIC IMAGERY
Greg M. Stock, National Park Service
Eric Hanson & Greg Downing, xRez Studio

4:30 PM – Discussion

Even more on Monday:

T160: From Virtual Globes to Geoblogs: Digital Innovations in Geoscience Research, Education, and Outreach (talks) schedule and abstracts

T160: From Virtual Globes to Geoblogs: Digital Innovations in Geoscience Research, Education, and Outreach (posters) schedule and abstracts

Stay tuned to Outcrop.org for subsequent developments and post-meeting extravaganza.

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

I have developed polygons showing likely extents of lakes related to both lobes of the Doublespring Landslide Complex on the Owyhee River. Using a combination of LiDAR data, ArcGIS, and GlobalMapper in conjunction with the highest plausible geomorphic evidence of fluvial overtopping the following lakes result:

East Spring Landslide: 878 m lake elevation.
West Spring Landslide: 868 m lake elevation.

The correspondence / lack of correspondence of these lakes with various upstream landforms and deposits is surprising.

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<div style=”width:425px;text-align:left” id=”__ss_2063781″>Bridging the Analog-Digital Gap in Geology </object><div style=”font-size:11px;font-family:tahoma,arial;height:26px;padding-top:2px;”>View more presentations from Kyle House.</div></div>

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

Including today’s.

Made with Garmin 60 csx, Google Earth, and Snagit. Mailed from Picasa.

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

Another example of the of the standard hillshade vs. 'isotropic' hillshade (isoshade) concept previously described with reference to the Owyhee River, OR. These are from a couple of reaches of the the Bill Williams River, AZ. The BWR data set is fine until the trees get in the way. Both image variations are pleasing. The standard hillshade looks 'natural' but the isoshade image reveals more intricate details.

See the full gallery on posterous

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth

Turns out that ArcMap has some very useful tools buried in the toolbox for evaluating the basic characteristics of LiDAR data. For example, using the 3D analyst extension, it is possible to collate the basic parameters of *.LAS tile sets. For example, the following steps:

3d analyst > conversion > from file > point file information
will generate a polygon shape file of the data tiles and will atrribute each tile set with measures of point count, point spacing, max z, min z, etc. This is useful because it is nice to have a simple polygon file that shows the extent of the data and some of the metrics in the attribute table are important to have for applying other types of processing to the data. In the figure above, the tiles are labeled according to object id (OID) rather than filename because the filenames are exceedingly cumbersome.

Posted via email from Fresh Geologic Froth